ON THE RIVER AT 801 SOPHIA STREET IN DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA

Photograph

 

 

Fredericksburg, Virginia, from across the Rappahannock River in 1863

 

This photo from the Smithsonian archives was taken after the first Battle of Fredericksburg. Shiloh's original brick building is on the banks of the river at the far right in the photo.

 

Web content copyright © 2015 by Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site), 801 Sophia Street, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401

List of approximately 625 members
of Shiloh Baptist Church in 1854-1856

The following list of names is based on our best interpretation of handwritten membership rolls from the 1854-1856 time period. All of these individuals were either enslaved or free blacks living in the Fredericksburg, Virginia, area.

Keep in mind that the spelling of some names changed over time. We have reproduced here the names as best we can interpret them from 1854-1856 membership roll. Some of the handwriting is hard to read. Styles of cursive writing have changed over the years. So some of it is hard to interpret.

The members listed below are organized alphabetically by last name.

Additional information about individuals is included when available to us.

Scroll down to search the whole list.

Above: Sample page from the old membership roll

Alexander, John

Allen, Robert

Allen, Sarah

Armstead, Chaney

Armstead, Charles

Armstead, Milly

Armstead, Peter

Armstead, Richard

Armstead, William

Armstrong, Betsy

 

Bacey, Rebecca

Bacey, Simon

  • He is listed in an 1886 court document as a leading trustee of Shiloh Baptist Church. In that handwritten document, his name appears to have been spelled as "Simon Bascay."

 

Badger, Sicily

Baker, William

Bankhead, Theofilus

Banks, Mary

Banks, Peter

Banks, Thomas

Barnes, Charles

Beale, Fanny

Beale, Reuben

Bellford, Arthur

Berry, Betsy

Berry, Peter

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified Peter Berry's color as "black" and indicated that he had been born in about 1829.

 

Berry, Phillis

Beverly, Jacob

Blackburn, Mary

Blackwell, Agnes

Blair, Mildred

Blankman, Andrew

Boller, Somin

Boss, Charlotte

Botts, Thomas

Boulding, Charlotte

Bowlen, Lewis

Bowling, Moses

Braxton, Anky

Braxton, Lewis

Brockenbrough, Henry

Brooke, Cordelia

Brooke, Edward Sr.

  • Edward Brooke Sr. later became a founding member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. He was also the grandfather of Edward Brooke III, who became the first African American democratically elected to the United States Senate.

 

Brooke, Edward

Brooke, James

Brooke, Sedelia

Brooke, Winney

Brown, Arthur

Brown, Docia

Brown, Doshe

Brown, Elijah

Brown, Emily

Brown, Jane

  • She later became a founding member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C.

 

Brown, John H.

Brown, Julia

Brown, Lucinda

Brown, Scott

Brown, Shephard

Brown, Susan

Bryant, Beverly

Bryant, Johnson

Bryant, Sally

Buckner, Sallie

Bundy, Jane

Bundy, Mary Jane

Bundy, Moses

Burke, Sarah

Burls, Jane

Burruss, Ellen

Butler, Aylett

Butler, Edward

Butler, William

 

Carter, Amanda

Carter, Eliza

Carter, Evelina

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified her color as "mulatto" and indicated that she had been born in about 1820.

 

Carter, George

Carter, Harriet

Carter, Milly

Carter, Robert

Carter, Samuel

Carter, Sophia

Carter, Thomas

Carter, William

Chessels, Sylva

Chivis, William

Clark, Eliza

Clarke, Fanny

Cole, Jane

Colson, Hannah

Colson, Rich

Corbin, Rich L.

Corey, Jane

Coulson, Kitty

Cross, Julia

Cross, Mary

Crozier, Anita

Crump, Kitty

Curtis, Charlotte

Curtis, Elijah

Curtis, Polly

 

Dade, Matilda

Daingerfield, Finella

Davenport, Eliza

Davenport, Eve

Davenport, James

Davis, Betsy

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg listed an "Elizabeth Daivs" (probably the same as "Betsy Davis"). This listing classified her color as "mulatto" and indicated that she had been born in about 1820.

 

Davis, Diane

Davis, Edward

Davis, Harriet

Davis, Hominy

Davis, Hushy

Davis, John

Davis, Ninny

Davis, Safina

Davis, William Jr.

Davis, William

Dawdle, Isabel

Day, Lucy

Day, Solomon

Delivies, Hennetta

Dixon, Frank

Dixon, George

  • George Dixon had initially been enslaved by the Thornton family of Port Royal in Caroline County, but because of his biblical knowledge and gift for speaking, he became one of Shiloh's preaching deacons. He often functioned as an informal minister and preacher in the Fredericksburg area prior to the Civil War. He had also worked for a time as a waiter at the Exchange Hotel in Richmond and as a dray man in Fredericksburg. During the Civil War, he was "pressed into service" by General Irvin McDowell of the Federal Army and became his guide for a while. During the Civil War, George Dixon resided for a time in Washington, D.C., where he was ordained in 1865 at 19th Street Baptist Church, after which he returned to Fredericksburg and became Shiloh's very active and beloved pastor. He was known as a a gifted orator and organizer. He resigned as Shiloh's pastor in 1878, after which he pastored a variety of churches in Spotsylvania and Caroline counties, while simultaneously maintaining some ties with the Shiloh congregation. He died at his daughter's home in Philadelphia, but his body was returned to Fredericksburg for burial in Shiloh's cemetery.

 

Dixon, Mary

Douglas, Jackson

 

Early, Ann

Early, Lucy Ann

Ebilson, Charles

Ellis, Hanson

Ellis, Johnson

 

Fauntleroy, James

Fauntleroy, Patrick

Fauntleroy, William

Fisher, Emmanuel

Fisher, Maria

Fitzhugh, Agnes

Fitzhugh, Elizabeth

Fitzhugh, George

Fitzhugh, Hannah

Fore, Delphy

Fortes, Cain

Fortune, Patsy

Fountain, Thomas

Frackleton, George

Fraction, Mary

Fracture, George

Frazier, Henry

  • He later became a founding member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C.

 

Frazier, Lucy

Frazier, Martha

 

Garner, James

Garnett, James

Garnett, Matilda

Gates, Davy

Gates, Milly

Gentell, Louisa

Gibbs, Onimus

Gillian, Nancy

Gillis, Cyrus

Gordon, Harrison

Graham, Aley

Granch, Samuel

Grandison, John

Grandison, Sharlotte

Grant, Chaney

Grant, Sam

Grant, Saul

Gray, Hosea

Gray, Lois

Gray, Travers

Gray, William

Green, Caroline

Green, Fanny

Green, Hannah

Green, Harriet

Green, Maria

Green, Milly

Green, Nancy

Greenhow, Amanda

Greenhow, Thomas

Griffin, Mahala

Gusty, Maria

Gusty, Marian

Gwathmey, John

 

Hackley, Henry

Hailstock, Louisa

Harris, Judy

Harris, Lucy

Harris, Mary

Harrison, Abram

Harrison, Mary

Harrison, Sam

Hartell, William

Hawkins, Jack

Hawkins, Nancy

Hawkins, Zachary

Hayes, Eliza

Hayes, Thomas

Henderson, Jerry

Henderson, Lettie

Hermes, Alsey

Hewlett, Henry

Hewlett, Kitty

Hewlett, Louisa

Hewlett, William

Higdon, Clara

Hill, Betsy

Hill, Henry

Hoomes, Alsey

Hoomes, Mary Ann

Howard, Abram

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg described Abraham Howard as a "blacksmith." It classified his color as "mulatto" and indicated that she had been born in about 1800.

 

Howard, Douglas

Howard, Milly

Howard, William

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg suggests that William Howard was a son of the Abraham Howard who was working in Fredericksburg as a "blacksmith." This listing classified William's color as "mulatto" and indicated that she had been born in about 1835.

 

Hunter, Hannah

Hunter, James

Hunter, John K.

Hunter, Robert

Hunter, Rosetta

Hunter, Tatty

Hurleth, Kitty

 

Inglass, Jackson

 

Jackson, Ann Eliza

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified her color as "black" and indicated that she had been born in about 1829. An 1860 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg described her as a "seamstress," classified her color as "mulatto," and indicated that she had been born in about 1828.

 

Jackson, Betsy

Jackson, Eliza

Jackson, Evelina

Jackson, Frederick

Jackson, George

  • George Jackson fled to Washington, D.C., early in the Civil War. He was ultimately ordained as a Christian minister and became one of the founders of what became known as Zion Baptist in Washington, a congregation that is still going strong.

Jackson, Henry

Jackson, Jane

Jackson, Judy

Jackson, Lucky

Jackson, Mary

  • An 1860 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified her color as "mulatto," and indicated that she had been born in about 1848.

 

Jackson, Milly

Jackson, Mollie

Jackson, Robert

Jackson, Sueky

Jackson, Tulip

James, Harriet

Jefferson, Robert

Jenkins, Fanny

Johnson, Alsy

Johnson, Betsy

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg included a Betsy Johnson whose color it classified as "black." This same listing indicated that she had been born in about 1754. She was 96 at the time of the 1850 listing, which might seem surprising, but another "free" black woman in the same listing was described as being 103 at the time.

 

Johnson, Caroline

Johnson, E.

Johnson, Esau

Johnson, Fanny

Johnson, Harriet

Johnson, Henry

Johnson, Jane

Johnson, Mary

Johnson, Mary

Johnson, Mary

Johnson, Nancy

Johnson, Rachel

Johnson, Sarah

Johnson, Thomas

Johnson, Winny

Johnston, Essex

Johnston, Fountain

Johnston, William

Johnston, William J.

Jones, Ben

Jones, Mary

Jones, William

 

Kelly, Ann

Kelly, Judy

Kertly, Mary

Keys, Sallie

Keyton, William

King, John

Kinney, Caroline A.

Knight, Rachel

 

Lambert, Mary

Lambeth, Maria

Lambrick, Mary

Lambrous, Franky

Lawson, Hannibal

Lawson, Jane

Lee, Billy

Lee, Clarisa

Lee, Sarah

Leonard, Aaron

Lewis, David Jr.

Lewis, Davy

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified his color as "mulatto" and indicated that he had been born in about 1835. His mother may have been Winny Lewis.

 

Lewis, Dolly

Lewis, Ethelinda

Lewis, Fielding

Lewis, Henry Jr.

Lewis, Henry

Lewis, James

Lewis, Kitty

Lewis, Louisa

Lewis, Nancy

Lewis, Patrick

Lewis, Patsy

Lewis, Tulip

Lewis, Winny

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified her color as "mulatto" and indicated that she had been born in about 1810. She may have been the mother of Davy Lewis.

 

Lomax, Mary

Lomax, Samuel

Long, Lizzy

Loving, Rachel

Lucas, Betty

  • Betty  (or sometimes "Bettie") Lucas was the daughter of Rachel Lucas and sister of Diana Lucas. An 1860 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified her color as "mulatto," and indicated that she had been born in about 1.

 

Lucas, Diana

  • Diana Lucas was the daughter of Rachel Lucas; she married Armistead Walker Jr., son of the Armistead Walker who was functionally serving as the pastor of the congregation until his death in 1860.

 

Lucas, Ellen

Lucas, George

Lucas, Griffin

Lucas, Harriet

Lucas, Henry Jr.

Lucas, Henry Sr.

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg showed a "Henry Lucas" as having been born in about 1835, wtih his color classified as "mulatto."  Whether this was Henry Jr. or Henry Sr. was not specified.

 

Lucas, Lucinda Walker

  • An 1860 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg described her as a "washerwoman," classified her color as "mulatto," and indicated that she had been born in about 1815.

 

Lucas, Lucy Ann

  • An 1860 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg described her occupation as a "servant," classified her color as "mulatto," and indicated that she had been born in about 1849, meaning that she was already a working woman at age 11.

 

Lucas, Lucy Ellen

Lucas, Milly

Lucas, Patsey

Lucas, Rachel

  • Rachel Lucas was the mother of Betty and Diana Lucas.

 

Lucas, Robert

  • Robert Lucas was listed in an 1887 court document as trustee of Shiloh Baptist Church.

Lucas, Sandy

 

Macrae, Hannah

Macrae, Isabella

Macrae, Martha

Macray, Philip

Madowney, Lucy

Magwin, Eliza

Mars, George

Mason, John

Mason, Kitty

Mason, Lydia

Matthews, Henderson

Matthews, Sela

Matthews, Thornton

Matthews, William

McQuay, Charles

McQuay, Dunmore

McQuin, Betsy

McQuin, Isabella

Merricks, Agnes

Merricks, Angel

Merricks, Oswald

Meyers, Jerry

Miers, Charles

Miller, Armistead

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg listed an "Armsted" Miller as a free "black" and indicated that he had been born in about 1790.

 

Miller, Bayliss

Miller, Frances

Miller, James

Miller, Juliet

Minor, Adison

Minor, Allen

Minor, Andrew

Minor, Bowling

Minor, Charles

Minor, Lucy

Minor, Rachel

Mitchell, Jane

Monday, Ailack

Morgan, Betsy

  • She later became a founding member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C.

 

Morgan, Clem

  • He later became a founding member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C.

 

Morgan, Daniel

Morgan, Henry

Morley, Milly

Morris, Clara

Morton, Amager

Morton, Edward

Morton, Henry

Morton, Mary

Moxley, Daniel

Murray, Betsy

Myers, Eve

Myers, Fanny

Myers, Harriet

Myers, James

Myers, Jerry

Myers, Samuel

Myers, Saul

 

Nash, Martha

Nelson, Alfred

Nelson, Betsy

Nelson, Hannah

Nelson, Harriet

Nelson, James

Nelson, Priscilla

Nelson, Robert

Nelson, Thornton

Nervis, Caroline

Nervis, Patsy

Nichols, Charlotte

Nicking, Rose

Norris, Polly

 

Ogle, Margaret

 

Packer, Milly

Page, Jane

Parker, George

Parker, James

Parker, Margaret

Parker, Mary

Parker, Mary

Parker, Matthew

Parker, Milly

Parker, William

Parks, Sallie

Payne, Andrew

Payne, James

  • He later became a founding member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C., where he frequently served as the Sunday school that taught religious education as well as basic reading and writing skills. He was also the leading tenor in Shiloh of Washington's church choir.

 

Payne, Lettie

Payne, Maria

Payne, William

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg listed him as an "apprentice," classified his color as "mulatto," and indicated that he had been born in about 1835.

 

Payne, Winston

Pendleton, Alfred

  • He later became a founding member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C.

 

Pendleton, Daingerfield

Penn, Gilbert

Pettis, Liley

Pettis, Lilvy

Peyton, Benjamin

Peyton, Edmund

Peyton, Sally

Peyton, Thornton

Pierce, Mary

Piper, William

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified his color as "mulatto" and indicated that he had been born in about 1826.

 

Plummer, Henry

Pollard, Sarah

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified her color as "black" and indicated that she had been born in about 1830.

 

Prior, Beverly

  • An 1860 listing of "free inhabitants" of "St. George's Parish" in Spotsylvania classified her as a "laborer" whose skin color was "black." It indicated that she had been born in about 1810. Her last name was sometimes spelled "Pryor."

 

Prior, Charles Jr.

Prior, Charles Sr.

Prosier, Anita

 

Racks, Milly

Rankin, Clara

Ransom, William

Ray, Clara

Ray, Clem

Ray, Sally

Read, Fanny

Redman, Fanny

Redmon, Julia

Reed, Emily

Reed, Penny

Richards, Edward

Richards, James

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified his color as "mulatto" and indicated that he had been born in about 1832. His mother, also listed as "free," appears to have been Maria Richards.

 

Roane, Rosa

Roanne, Licily

Robbins, Flora

Roberson, Lucy

Roberson, Ninny

Roberson, Patsy

Robinson, Ellick

Robinson, Laicy

Robinson, Philip

Rollins, Daniel

Rollins, James

Roots, Fanny

Rose, Grandison

Ross, Eliza

Ross, Joseph

Ross, Judy

Ross, Sally

Ross, Sara

Rowser, Dicy

Rowzer, Daniel

Rowzer, Solomon

Roy (his only name)

Rozer, Marsha

Rucker, Betsy

 

Sale, George

Saunders, Griffin

  • He later became a founding member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C.

 

Saunders, Mary

Saunders, William

Scott, Albert

Scott, Allen

Scott, Armistead

Scott, Elijah

Scott, Henry

Scott, Maria

Scott, Milly

Scott, Sally

Scott, Samuel

Semple, Delila

Semple, James G.

  • He later became a founding member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C., where he served as that church's first choir master.

 

Semple, Rosetta

Shanklin, George

Shanklin, Susan

Shelton, William

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg listed him as a "carpenter," classified his color as "mulatto," and indicated that he had been born in about 1811.

 

Simpson, William

Sliankler, George

Smith, Anne

Smith, Benjamin

Smith, Inez

Smith, Robert

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg listed a "Robert B. Smith" as a "bricklayer." It classified his color as "mulatto" and indicated that he had been born in about 1812.

 

Smithers, Cater

Splear, Charles

Stan, Mary Ann

Stanard, Fanny

Stankler, George

Stewart, Moses

Strech, Whitfield

Strecher, Charles

Streets, Whitfield

Strother, Charles

Sturns, Betty

 

Taliaferro, Edward

Tasco, Sarah

Taylor, Buddy

Taylor, Caroline

  • An 1860 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classifies her skin color as "mulatto" and describes her as having been born in about 1831. At the time of that listing, she appears to have been married to John J. Taylor, in which case she might have orignally been Caroline Walker.

 

Taylor, Churchill

Taylor, Jerry

Taylor, John

Taylor, John J.

  • An 1860 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classifies his skin color as "mulatto" and describes his occupation as "barber." This same listing suggests that he was born in about 1827. At the time of this listing, he appears to have been married to Caroline Taylor, who might have orignally been Caroline Walker, since John J. Taylor was known to be a brother-in-law of William J. Walker. During the Civil War, John J. Taylor became a founding member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C.

 

Taylor, Lucy

Taylor, Samuel

Taylor, Sarah

Thomas, Ezekiel

Thomas, Lucy

Thomas, Manuel

Thompson, Elizabeth

Thompson, Mary Jane

Thomson, Charlotte

Thomson, Rachel

Thornley, Robert

Thornton, Edward

Thornton, Lilly

Thornton, Matilda

Thornton, Susan

Timber, Betsy

Timber, Venus

Triplet, Frances

Triplet, Richard

Tuccush, Polly

Turner, Evelina

Turner, Lucy

Turner, Sarah Ann

Turner, Winny

Tuscan, Earl

Tuscan, Emile

Tyler, George

Tyler, John

Tyler, Lidia

Tyler, Philip

 

Valentine, Henry

 

Waddy, Caroline

Waddy, Travers

Walker, Abba

Walker, Ann

  • Ann Walker fled north early in the Civil War. She was one of a group of people from Shiloh in Fredericksburg who founded a still thriving congregation in Washington, D.C., known as Zion Baptist Church

 

Walker, Armistead Jr.

  • Armistead Walker Jr. was the son of the functional pastor of the congregation; he later married Diana Lucas.

 

Walker, Armistead Sr.

  • Armistead Walker Sr. was a talented gardener as well as one of the first ordained black preachers in Virginia. Functionally, he was the unofficial pastor of Shiloh prior to his death in 1860, even though a white man (George Rowe) served as the legally required overseer of the congregation when it met for worship.

 

Walker, Beverly

Walker, Elizabeth

Walker, Emily

Walker, Lucinda

Walker, Mary E.

  •  Mary E. Walker was the wife of William Walker. Her name had originally been Mary Taylor. An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified her color as "mulatto" and indicated that she had been born in about 1825.

 

Walker, Mary A.

Walker, Rebecca

Walker, Robert

Walker, William

  • A talented painter prior to the Civil War, William Walker was also a preaching deacon at Shiloh. His uncle, Armistead Walker, was the functional (if unofficial) pastor of Shiloh in Fredericksburg prior to 1860. William Walker was in one of the first groups of African Americans in Fredericksburg to flee to freedom during the Civil War when they had the chance. During the Civil War, he was among the group of people from Fredericksburg who organized two still thriving congregations in Washington, D.C.: Zion Baptist Church and Shiloh Baptist Church. Initially he served as a part-time pastor for each. Later he became the first full-time pastor of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified his color as "mulatto" and indicated that he had been born in about 1821.

 

Wallace, Carter

Wallace, James

Walters, Robert

Walters, Sarah

Wanser, Louisa

Ware, Henry

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified his color as "black" and indicated that he had been born in about 1839.

 

Ware, Lucinda

Ware, Rose

Ware, Sealia

Warner, Nancy

Warren, Robert

Washington, Betsy

Washington, Charlotte

Washington, Daniel

Washington, David

Washington, Harriet

Washington, Henry

Washington, John

  • John Washington was the first person to escape from slavery in Fredericksburg while Union troops were camped on the other side of the Rappahannock River during the Civil War. He led the way out of enslavement on Good Friday 1862. He went to Washington, D.C., where he joined others from Fredericksburg in founding that city's Shiloh Baptist Church. He later served as that congregation's Sunday school superintendent. He wrote a fascinating memoir of his 1862 escape from slavery in Fredericksburg, which can be found in the book A Slave No More.

 

Washington, Lelia

Washington, Louisa

Washington, Maria

Washington, Matilda

Washington, Sally

Washington, Sam

Washington, Samuel

Washington, William

Washington, Willie

Water, Davy

Watkins, Thomas

Watson, Dennis

Watson, Dicey

Watson, June

Watts, Lucy

Watts, Peter

Webb, Mary

Webb, Winny

West, James

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg described James West as a "blacksmith," classified his color as "black," and indicated that he had been born in about 1799.

 

West, Lucinda

West, Maria

Wharton, Beverly

Wheatley, Daphney

Wheatley, Washington

Wheeler, Jane

Wicks, Alexander

Wilkins, Cass

Wilkins, Dolly

Wilkins, Eifo

Wilkins, Lucy

Wilkins, Ralph

Wilkins, Thomas

Williams, Ann

Williams, Celia

Williams, Charlotte

Williams, Daniel

Williams, George

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified his color as "mulatto" and indicated that he had been born in about 1833. At the time of this listing, he appears to have been living with John J. and Caroline Taylor.

 

Williams, Harriet

Williams, Mary

Williams, Milly

Williams, Prince

Williams, Sally

Williams, Stephen

Williams, Susan

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified her color as "mulatto" and indicated that she had been born in about 1822.

 

Willis, Ann E.

Willis, Lucy

Wilson, Afsianna

Wilson, Daniel

Wilson, Hannah

Wilson, John Mason

  • He later became a founding member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C.

 

Wilson, Milly

Wilson, Moses

Wilson, Robert

Wilson, Rosena

Winslow, Hennetta

Winston, Matilda

Wood, Emily

Woodson, Eliza

  • An 1850 listing of "free inhabitants" of Fredericksburg classified her color as "black" and indicated that she had been born in about 1819.

 

Wormley, Maria

Wormley, Missy

Wormley, Susan

Wormley, Tarlton

Wormley, William

Wright, Jane

Wright, Judy

Wright, Washington

  • He is listed in an 1886 court document as a leading trustee of Shiloh Baptist Church. In that handwritten document, his name appears to have been spelled as "Simon Bascay."

 

Yancey, Armstead

Yates, Davy